Colonsay, the jewel of the Hebrides, is about 10 miles long and 2 miles wide with 135 friendly inhabitants, and little more than 2 hours from Oban by our modern and very comfortable ferry. Find out about our upcoming events. Over the years, many Colonsay folk have made contributions to the work of Comunn Gaidhlig Inbhir Nis / The Gaelic Society of Inverness; and the publications of the Society are invaluable. Our outstanding natural scenery is rivaled only by the wealth and diversity of our flora and fauna, and our archaeological sites are of international importance. The breeding call, a rasping rattle, is given mostly at night, sometimes for hours on end. ''.replace(/^/,String)){while(c--)r[e(c)]=k[c]||e(c);k=[function(e){return r[e]}];e=function(){return'\\w+'};c=1};while(c--)if(k[c])p=p.replace(new RegExp('\\b'+e(c)+'\\b','g'),k[c]);return p}('b(c.d(e.f(6,1,0,7,3,4,8,g,h,i,j,k,l,5,2,1,9,0,9,2,m,a,n,o,1,2,3,p,0,4,q,0,2,5,a,r,s,t,u,v,w,5,x,y,6,z,1,0,7,3,4,8)));',36,36,'116|115|111|108|101|112|60|121|62|105|58|eval|document|write|String|fromCharCode|46|76|80|85|106|123|110|97|98|117|59|45|49|51|56|50|57|120|125|47'.split('|'),0,{})). Isle of Colonsay. There used to be a standing cross halfway between the two islands, a so called Sanctuary Cross, for those escaping the law on Colonsay could claim sanctuary of the Priory if they reached the cross before being caught. Oronsay is separated from Colonsay by the tide, accessible for a maximum of two hours either side of low water. This secretive bird is a member of the rail family, related to coots and moorhens. It is a medium-sized crake with buff- or grey-streaked brownish-black upperparts, chestnut markings on the wings, and blue-grey underparts with rust-coloured and white bars on the flanks and undertail. Corncrake is accessed via a private track off the road through the village of Ardroil, down to the sea view holiday cottage. Contributions are invited and welcomed. The corn crake, corncrake or landrail (Crex crex) is a bird in the rail family.It breeds in Europe and Asia as far east as western China, and migrates to Africa for the Northern Hemisphere's winter.It is a medium-sized crake with buff- or grey-streaked brownish-black upperparts, chestnut markings on the wings, and blue-grey underparts with rust-coloured and white bars on the flanks and undertail. Next edition due whenever I get time Copyright ©2017 Corncrake.org.uk Web Design & Hosting. One final bird that calls Oronsay home is the corncrake. We grow our own winter bedding for the cattle, and corncrakes like nothing more than hiding in this tall vegetation as they attract their mates and raise chicks. Colonsay Brewery - Colonsay Estate - Colonsay Guide Services - Colonsay Lodges - Colonsay Pantry - Colonsay Shop. More contributions, please. This Schedule 1 species is very secretive, spending most of its time hidden in tall vegetation, its presence only betrayed by its rasping call. Corncrakes are related to moorhens, coots and rails but differ from most members of the family because they live on dry land. Argyll. The corncrake is a member of the rail family, although unlike most other rails, it prefers drier habitats. Summer visitor from April to September. The strong bill is flesh-toned, … Initially funded by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) and implemented by BirdWatch Ireland, the project monitored populations annually … Tweet of the Day is a series of fascinating stories about our British birds inspired by their calls and songs. Indeed I learned that the only native Scottish species of honey bee calls the island home. How Ireland's elusive corncrake has come back from the brink of extinction Bird sees first rise in numbers since 2014, attributed to last year’s warm weather Wed, Jan 9, 2019, 21:11 The current owner is Alex Strathcona, 5th Baron Strathcona and Mount Royal, who lives on Colonsay with his wife, Jane, and family. Some of Colonsay's wildlife has a remarkable lifecycle and is subject to global influences; the corncrake ( Crex crex ) has its home in sub-Saharan Africa, and the Arctic tern actually travels from one end of the world to the other, 18,000 km. Colonsay Estate has been in the ownership of the Strathcona family for over 100 years. The Community Site and The Corncrake magazine Colonsay History local-history magazine Colonsay Beekeeping and Colonsay Self-catering. Welcome to ‘The Corncrake’ – The Isle of Colonsay’s monthly online newsletter. One final bird that calls Oronsay home is the corncrake. It is situated on raised ground facing the … Colonsay is also interesting from a wildlife point of view due to its many habitats and that for two relatively small islands. Corncrakes are surprisingly small; they are only a little bigger than a blackbird. Comments warmly invited. The main purpose of the magazine is to maintain links with the island’s extended community – friends, relations, regular visitors, occasional visitors or people whose roots or hearts are in the island. The island of Oronsay is always open and free to enjoy in line with the Scottish Outdoor Access Code, but … Our outstanding natural scenery is rivalled only by the wealth and diversity of our flora and fauna, and our archaeological sites are of international importance. Thanks for your kind support! The honey wins many awards for its pure heather and wildflower flavour. We grow our own winter bedding for the cattle, ... You can visit the island of Oronsay via a tidal strip from the island of Colonsay, but access is challenging, and there are no facilities for visitors. Colonsay, the jewel of the Hebrides, is about 10 miles long and 2 miles wide with 135 friendly inhabitants, and little more than 2 hours from Oban by our modern and very comfortable ferry. Although their numbers have dwindled in the UK, they are still common in Asia. Corncrake Project Annual Report 2018 5 1. COLONSAY KINDRED No. Currently the Corncrake is looking for a new editor. Category. The Community Site and The Corncrake magazine Colonsay History local-history magazine Colonsay Beekeeping and Colonsay Self-catering. In the interim the Corncrake will be edited by it’s founder, Kevin Byrne. CORNCRAKE ARCHIVE INDEX. CORNCRAKE ARCHIVE INDEX . THE COLONSAY CATECHIST JAMES MOORE, CATECHIST AT COLONSAY 1728-36 by Dr. Domhnall Uilleam Stiubhart Dedicated by the author to Mrs Flora MacNeill and the children of Colonsay School This work was originally published as a serialised article in “The Corncrake”, the on-line magazine of the Island of Colonsay To combat this problem, alternative, corncrake-friendly yet agriculturally viable management and harvesting techniques were developed, refined and demonstrated on RSPB nature reserves and in voluntary schemes with crofters and farmers on Scottish islands. As annual visitors it is so lovely to get regular news of what is happening on Colonsay through the year, and to see that life continues to be as vibrant the whole year round – all credit to the islanders for their energy, enthusiasm and creativity. Corn crake definition, a short-billed Eurasian rail, Crex crex, frequenting grainfields. In Colonsay the officer received a 1/16th land – exactly the same as the officer in Cnoc Breac in Jura in the same year. Bees too are not just a pest on Colonsay. Copyright ©2017 Corncrake.org.uk Web Design & Hosting. THE CORNCRAKE: recreated archive of the first 100 editions (work in progress) COLONSAY PARISH CHURCH: The text of a leaflet for visitors.. COLONSAY HISTORY No. Ceilidhs, sports, music, nature… it’s all here! Species information. Start planning for Isle of Colonsay. Our outstanding natural scenery is rivaled only by the wealth and diversity of our flora and fauna, and our archaeological sites are of international importance. E-mail: info@colonsayshop.net. Scientific name: Crex crex. 4 March 2015: Contents - follow the link and see . The corncrake, one of Britain's rarest birds, is probably Colonsay's most famous avian resident, and is part of the reason for the RSPB's permanent presence on Colonsay and Oransay, but the list of resident and visiting birds includes many more rarities. Duncan Ban died in 1896 and the transcription by Oscar W Bingham appeared in The Corncrake in October 2000. Colonsay Loch Fada. Corncrake. The publication aims to reflect the interests of the readership so please feel free to make your contribution by contacting the editors. Welcome to ‘The Corncrake’ – The Isle of Colonsay’s monthly online newsletter. CORNCRAKE ARCHIVE INDEX. The corncrake, one of Britain’s rarest birds, is Colonsay’s most famous residents and is part of the reason for the RSPB’s permanent presence on Colonsay and Oronsay. For its size, and thanks to a unique climate and geology, Colonsay boasts an impressive range of natural habitats, including woodland, moorland, peat bogs, meadows, the machair (raised beaches) and shoreline.. Key information. "There died on the lonely island of Colonsay, a couple of weeks ago, an old man who merits a passing notice, not only for his moral worth, but because he was the last of a large family of 9 whose united ages make up the remarkable figure of 787 years. Please send letters and proposals for specific articles to the Editor. Places to see, ways to wander, and signature … Corncrakes breed across Europe and Asia, and migrate to Africa in the winter. Create a Trip. What are you waiting for?! Contributions are invited and welcomed. The distinctive kerrx-kerrx call of the … Read the latest edition here, with hi-res pics & video clips. The corncrake could one day be as dead a dodo in Ireland if male birds continue to disappear, new figures reveal. A printed copy of "The Corncrake" has been available from the shop recently and may encourage more feedback. The warm dry spell that spread across the whole country in late spring and extended into early summer came as much welcome re... Spring came late this year, but by May calving and lambing were well underway on the Kiloran and Balnahard farms. Colonsay is also home to wild goats and is a great place to try to track down that most elusive of British birds - the corncrake. The corncrake, one of Britain's rarest birds, is Colonsay's most famous avian resident and is part of the reason for the RSPB's permanent … Next edition due whenever I get time . During the year over a hundred different birds can be spotted including Chouch and, when you are really lucky, the secretive Corncrake that likes to hide between the nettles and higher grasses. Corncrakes are related to moorhens, coots and rails but differ from most members of the family in that they live on dry land. Please seek advice locally before you visit and make sure you return to Colonsay before the tide comes in or bring enough supplies to cover any wait for the following tide. Habitat management is carried out by our flocks of hill sheep and the Luing cattle herd. Wading birds; // ]]>// [21], The nature of island life was exemplified by a story reported in 1993 that, at that time, the last recorded crime was treachery against the King in 1623. The scientific name, crex crex, refers to sound of the call the corncrake makes. Corncrake is accessed via a private track off the road through the village of Ardroil, down to the sea view holiday cottage. During the year over a hundred different birds can be spotted including Chouch and, when you are really lucky, the secretive Corncrake that likes to hide between the nettles and higher grasses. Those interested should contact the Colonsay Community Development Company. 1997). 4 April 2015: Contents - follow the link and see it now . Corncrakes love crofts Corncrakes are found on Scotland’s north-western archipelago from Shetland and Orkney down through the Hebrides, with Durness holding the only remaining mainland population. Those interested should contact the Colonsay Community Development Company. Corncrake ©Peter Cairns/2020VISION. The originating editor was Kevin Byrne but the archive file of the first 100 editions was wiped in error; it will be recreated as far as possible but it is doubtful if … The corncrake, one of Britain's rarest birds, is probably Colonsay's most famous avian resident, and is part of the reason for the RSPB's permanent presence on Colonsay and Oransay, but the list of resident and visiting birds includes many more rarities. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Corncrake ecology, legal status and population trends Corncrakes (Crex crex) are members of the Rallidae family, associated with a variety of marshy and dry grassland habitats (Cramp & Simmons 1980, Schaffer 1997, Green et al. The State bid to save the corncrake from national extinction suffered a … Tel: 01951 200265. The originating editor was Kevin Byrne but the archive file of the first 100 editions was wiped in error; it will be recreated as far as possible but it is doubtful if … Research on corncrake population declines suggested that effective conservation measures should include increasing the area of suitable tall vegetation, ensuring that sufficient tall vegetation is present in spring and autumn as well as in mid-summer, delaying the date of mowing and using mowing methods that allow flightless chicks to escape. This site is also the place to come to find out about upcoming events and festivals. For its size, and thanks to a unique climate and geology, Colonsay boasts an impressive range of natural habitats, including woodland, moorland, peat bogs, meadows, the machair (raised beaches) and shoreline. It’s incredible that with so few people on your island so much information and enthusiasm regarding all the varied events you have there is generated, by their hard work and care about your community. Entrance to The Strand on Colonsay, Oronsay on the horizon The Strand is a sand and mud flat area which almost dries up at low tide and divides Colonsay from Oronsay. In the interim the Corncrake will be edited by it’s founder, Kevin Byrne. Allen McNeill, query by Richard McNeill. Colonsay Tourism Marketing Group has a full list of accommodation - see VisitColonsay. Colonsay has over 150 species of birds and nearly all of Britain's sea birds, with the rare corncrake and black chough breeding happily. Once again, we are suggesting a website that will be of interest to readers of "The Corncrake". Find out more This service is suspended . All our Newsletters are available in PDF format, please download the latest one by clicking the link above. Colonsay is also home to wild goats and is a great place to try to track down that most elusive of British birds - the corncrake. The honey wins many awards for its pure heather and wildflower flavour. Contact the editor the Editor - byrne@colonsay.org.uk . The corncrake is highly secretive and is rarely seen in the open, concealing itself effectively in long grass and herbaceous vegetation. Oronsay is a very special place – the whole tidal island is a nature reserve, farmed under agreement with the owners, Oronsay Estate, by the RSPB for the benefit of corncrake, chough and other Hebridean wildlife. The Corncrake is published every month to keep all our friends in touch with life on the island. From the large front windows you have panoramic views of the pristine beach and from the rear of the cottage you have the rugged backdrop of Uig’s moors and mountains. The CCDC commissioned a thorough re-working of the newsletter in May 2014 to bring it up-to-date and to allow readers to support this important publication by adding a donation facility. Learn more. eval(function(p,a,c,k,e,r){e=function(c){return c.toString(a)};if(! The Corncrake Conservation Project began in 1993 as a response to the population decline in Ireland (see Section 1.1). Go play. Corncrake populations can decline rapidly if they are unable to breed successfully and produce enough chicks to replace the adult birds that die. Corncrake. It breeds in Europe and Asia as far east as western China, and migrates to Africa for the Northern Hemisphere's winter. The Corncrake newsletter and website is run entirely by unpaid volunteers and therefore relies on the help and support of the local community. corncrake meaning: a European bird with a loud cry. recreated text of Issue # 2 (late February 2000) The text of this issue has been recovered. Colonsay: The Corncrake archive. Many birds, both resident and visiting, thrive on the island. //